Abstract

STUDY OF BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND SERUM VITAMIN D LEVELS IN HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

Author(s): S. Selvapandian Kirubaharan1, Arshiya Begum2, Priya Anbarasan3, Latha Jeyasubramanian4, Santhi Natesan5, Vanitha Kandasamy6, Deepalakshmi Paramasivan7, Saravanan Balasubramanian8

INTRODUCTION
Vitamin D metabolites participate in the regulation of calcium homoeostasis and bone metabolism. Severe and prolonged vitamin D deficiency causes osteomalacia. Subclinical vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly and may lead to development of secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone loss, for which reason it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of senile osteoporosis.
AIM
To determine the relationships between serum 25 (OH) D, bone mineral density, and serum calcium and phosphorus in 50 postmenopausal women.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
A population-based cross-sectional study with a total of 50 healthy women aged over 50 years with amenorrhoea for 12 months were included. None of the women were using hormone replacement therapy. Measurements of bone mineral density were performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Analysis of serum levels of 25(OH) D, calcium, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase were done.
RESULTS
There exists an inverse correlation between BMD and 25(OH) D levels (r = - 0.127, p>0.05) and that between 25 (OH) D and phosphate levels among postmenopausal women (r = -0.167, p >0.05), which is not significant. No significant difference exists in the serum levels of calcium, alkaline phosphatase between vitamin D insufficient & deficient persons (p >0.05).
CONCLUSION
Elevated levels of serum 25(OH) D were associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased bone turnover, but it was insignificant.