EARLY ENTERAL FEEDING AND DELAYED ENTERAL FEEDING- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

Abstract

Alli Muthiah1, Sridevi Karthikeyan2, Barath Raj Kumar3, Aruna M4

BACKGROUND
Nutrients form the fuel for the body, which comes in the form of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The body is intended to burn fuels in order to perform work. Starvation with malnutrition affects the postoperative patients and patients with acute pancreatitis. There is an increased risk of nosocomial infections and a delay in the wound healing may be noted. They are more prone for respiratory tract infections. Enteral Nutrition (EN) delivers nutrition to the body through gastrointestinal tract. This also includes the oral feeding. This study will review the administration, rationale and assess the pros and cons associated with the early initiation of enteral feeding.
The aim of this study is to evaluate if early commencement of enteral nutrition compared to traditional management (delayed enteral feeding) is associated with fewer complications and improved outcome-
? In patients undergoing elective/emergency gastrointestinal surgery.
? In patients with acute pancreatitis.
It is also used to determine whether a period of starvation (nil by mouth) after gastrointestinal surgery or in the early days of acute pancreatitis is beneficial in terms of specific outcomes.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
A prospective cohort interventional study was conducted using 100 patients from July 2012 to November 2012. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. Patients admitted in my unit for GIT surgeries or acute pancreatitis constituted the test group, while patients admitted in other units for similar disease processes constituted the control group.
RESULTS
Our study concluded that early enteral feeding resulted in reduced incidence of surgical site infections. When the decreased length of stay, shorter convalescent period and the lesser post-interventional fatigue were taken into account, early enteral feeding has a definite cost benefit.
CONCLUSION
Early enteral feeding was beneficial associated with fewer complications and was cost-effective in the study.

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