Abstract

A STUDY ON CLINICAL AND AETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF HYPOKALAEMIC PARALYSIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

Author(s): Kekathi Vidyasagar1, P. Ravikaladhar Reddy2, S. Chandrasekhar3, P. Prathap4, Tejaswini5

BACKGROUND
Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is a rare disorder characterised by transient attacks of flaccid paralysis of varying intensity and frequency. Although mostly familial in aetiology, several sporadic cases with different causes have been reported. There are two groups of disorders predominantly that causes hypokalaemic paralysis. One group is due to transcellular shift of potassium and other is due to loss of potassium from body either through GI tract or through renal system.
MATERIAL AND METHODS
Here we report a study on the clinical and aetiological profile of 30 cases of hypokalaemic paralysis admitted in our institution between January 2014 to January 2016.
RESULTS
The aetiological workup of all the patients was done which revealed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis as the major cause in 12 of 30 patients. Three rare causes of hypokalaemia have been diagnosed which included Bartter’s syndrome, Mixed Connective tissue disorder, Sjogren’s syndrome. Vomiting and diarrhoea was seen in 12 of 30 patients.
CONCLUSION
Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is a heterogenous group of disorder. A significant number of patients had thyroid disorders mostly in the form of thyrotoxicosis, non-renal and renal loss of potassium like diarrhoea and vomiting. Early recognition and prompt management of these conditions is essential to prevent residual deformity and further attacks in future.