Abstract

A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF NECROTISING FASCIITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

Author(s): Penugonda Adeppa, B. Sarada, Adimulam Kiran Kumar

BACKGROUND Necrotising fasciitis lesions are entities not frequently seen in daily surgical practice. These infections are marked by absence of clear local boundaries or palpable limits, which is responsible both for their severity and the frequent delay in recognizing their surgical nature. Necrotising fasciitis continues to challenge the practicing surgeon. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients of necrotising fasciitis were treated during the study period from August 2016 up to one year. Age, sex, associated co-morbid conditions, site of involvement, predisposing factors, addictions, clinical parameters like pyrexia, duration of symptoms, presence of hypotension are studied and compared. RESULTS 50 patients of necrotising fasciitis are treated during the study period. The age ranged from 22 to 71 years, the mean age being 44.5 ± 8.36 years. There were 38 males and 12 females. Male: female ratio is 3.17:1. Among 38 males, 6 patients died. This constitutes about 15.7%. Among 12 number of females 4 died. This constitutes about 33.3% mortality. CONCLUSION Necrotising fasciitis is more common in middle aged males. Diabetes mellitus is the most common co-morbid condition associated with necrotising fasciitis. Type I infection is more common. The presence of multiple co-morbid conditions reduces the survival. Early diagnosis and aggressive surgical debridement reduces mortality.